Skip to content
Students: Prospective • Current • Visiting | Faculty/Staff | Friends
submit
Print this page
E-mail this page

Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine

Science Education Home

Joel Stern, PhD

Joel Stern, PhD

Associate Professor, Science Education
Associate Professor, Dept of Neurology

PhD Biological Sciences, Harvard University; BS, Columbia University, 
Postdoc: Harvard Medical School and Yale School of Medicine

Research and Interests

Dr. Joel N.H. Stern received his bachelor’s degree from Columbia University and his PhD in Biological Sciences from Harvard University. He was inspired to pursue a PhD by his experiences teaching basic science at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s DNA Learning Center. He continued to teach during his time at Harvard, receiving several distinguished Derek Bok Awards for his teaching excellence. After receiving his PhD, he was awarded the Harvard Dean’s Scholar Award and he became an Instructor at Harvard Medical and Dental Schools. His interest in clinical immunology then led him to do a short post doctoral fellowship in Neurology at Yale Medical School.

He joined the Faculty of Science Education at the Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine in 2013. He is now working to integrate the concepts and challenges of scientific discovery into the medical school curriculum. Dr. Stern is a course director and chair of the student research advisory committee. He is also a faculty sponsor for the student-run Translational Medicine Club. In addition to his faculty appointment at the School of Medicine, Dr. Stern is also co-director of the autoimmune brain disorder research program at Northwell Health Lenox Hill, as well as a faculty member of Lenox Hill's neurology department. He has contributed to over 35 peer-reviewed manuscripts on the mechanisms and treatment of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

For a list of Dr. Stern’s publications:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=stern+jn
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=stern+j+and+silva+aj
Joel Stern - MS Study
Fox News : Researchers investigate origins of MS to target treament